Monday, September 18, 2017

Being Breast Cancer Savvy

Buried in another article based on a woman doctor's problems getting screened for breast cancer by the UK's NHS, are three rules on how to be 'Breast Cancer Savvy'

  • You Don't Need to Examine Your Breasts
    All women, no matter what age, should get to know their breasts. But experts have stopped recommending self-examination routines. Studies have shown that most women who find breast tumours do so during the course of everyday life: while dressing, or just rolling over in bed. The key is to know what looks and feels normal to you.
I wholeheartedly agree with this. I am incapable of finding any lumps.
  • Don't Ignore Symptoms
    The most common sign of breast cancer is a lump within the breast. But you might find one in the armpit or notice skin changes on the breast such as dimpling, and changes in the appearance of the nipple, or its shape or how it feels, or a discharge. Breast pain on one side that lasts after a period, a rash and any change in the size, shape or symmetry should be investigated.
Well 'doh!' If something not right, get it checked asap
  • Make Sure You Go To That MammogramIf breast cancer is detected early, it is more treatable. Screening uses mammograms – a type of X-ray – to look inside the breast. All women between 47 and 70 are invited for screening every three years. NHS screening is opt-in after 70, so make sure you get in touch with your local unit to make an appointment: nhs.uk/breastscreening.
Um yes. Its a great tool for finding breast cancer before it gets really big and ug

I think I will be forced to blog about the rest of the article tomorrow maybe. 47 is way too late to start mammograms. My maternal aunt was diagnosed at 76 with breast cancer....  Grrr.

But in the meantime. Be savvy. Savvy is almost like being cool.

1 comment:

Amanda Joseph said...

Thanks for sharing and protecting us from this heck.
Breast Cancer prevention

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