Friday, May 6, 2011

Knee pain and cures

I wasn't going to blog about medical studies because I have written so much about them recently but then I read the news this morning and this is what I found:

So now I want to eat a piece of bacon and sit on my butt and pout. (I am not picking on CNN but they did coincidentally happen to list all three of these today.)

Do you see how confusing medical research can be? I am done reading them but amazed what I can find even when I don't try.

But otherwise, I am fine. I am ignoring all these (confusing) studies. Today I am amazingly over scheduled. I don't know how I do this to myself (but it means I wont have time to sit around and pout).

Well, maybe I am not so fine. I have back pain, knee pain, ankle pain, and my annual mammogram and physical next week as well as a bone density scan and a visit with my pain doctor. This week my knee doctor recommended a series of injections into my knee to relieve the pain - which work 60-70% of the time (and I am going to assume they are completely painless). Otherwise, the only thing that will relieve the pain is knee replacement and I would rather discuss that in another 20 years.

I just looked up the knee injections. They are called Synvisc injections. My personal rule is you can't have an ailment or treatment unless you can spell it and pronounce it. Then I made the mistake of reading the procedure they follow to do the injections. That was a big mistake. A new personal rule - never read procedures before they happen.

But all these doctor appointments mean homework. I need to make a list of questions for my new primary care doctor as I enter the contest to be the least healthy patient of the year. And how many more doctor appointments will I get as a result? I seriously believe I am a professional patient. This is year number five of doctor visits numbering over 50 annually. But that's next week. Today I will just get through my busy day.

1 comment:

Sue A said...

OK, here is the deal on Synvisic:
I've been given it twice, by two different doctors. The first guy was a terminal incompetent, who slapped some lidocaine on knee prior to injection for a few seconds, then pushed the thick liquid into my kee quickly. Not only did my head nearly come off, but I almost levitated off the table from the pain. He recommended a course of 3 injections, I never went near him again.
The second doctor, who I saw several years later, was not surprised that I didn't want the injections when I said I had had one before, and it was awful. She said I'm good at this. And she was. She used a ton of anesthetic spray, and then gently inserted the needle and slowly filled the knee with Synvisic. Unfortunately, my knee was too far gone by the time I got to her, and I am now recuperating from a total knee replacement, but those totally pain free weeks right after the injecctions were wonderful.
I think this is like the totally different reports we get about isotope injections for SNB. Good doctors know how to minimize pain and suffering.